Mark Hayes’ “Requiem”

     Composer Mark Hayes’ vocal and instrumental writing is widely acclaimed and performed across the nation. He is well-known for his unique choral settings which draw from such diverse styles such as gospel, jazz, pop, folk, and classical to achieve a truly “American sound.”  His brand new Requiem, scored for two soloists, chorus and orchestra is a contemplative work using English translations combined with Latin text for a musically reflective experience.

Premiered at Lincoln Center with Hayes conducting in May 2013, this work includes seven movements of the Requiem Mass and, other than the dramatic “Dies Irae,” each movement features both Latin and English texts. Hayes has dedicated his new Requiem to his parents, both of whom passed away in the last few years.

Mark Hayes is an award-winning concert pianist, composer, arranger, conductor, and record producer. His personal catalog, totaling over 1000 published works, includes work for solo voice, solo piano, multiple pianos, orchestra, jazz combo, small instrumental ensembles, and choruses of all kinds. Among his many honors are the Award for Exemplary Leadership in Christian Music from Baylor University Center for Christian Music Studies, and, numerous times, the Standard Award from ASCAP.

For more exciting new works for choir, please contact us.  Shop Stanton’s for all your sheet music needs!

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Categories: Church Choral, Composers, New Publications, Staff Picks

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